Contact mesally@wellbeingeast.com     T: 07946 590691 

 

 

Research

Research fact sheets on the conditions listed below are provided by the British Acupuncture Council. The list is not exhaustive so please contact Sally on 07946 590691 if you wish to discuss a particular condition.

A
Acne
Allergic rhinitis
Anxiety
Arrhytmias & heart-failure

Asthma

B
Back pain
Bell's palsy

C
Cancer care
Carpal tunnel syndrome
Childbirth
Chronic fatigue syndrome
Chronic pain
Colds and flu
COPD
Coronary heart disease
Cystitis

D
Dementia
Depression
Dysmenorrhoea

E
Eczema and Psoriasis
Endometriosis

F
Facial pain
Female fertility
Fibromyalgia
Frozen shoulder

G
Gastrointestinal tract disorders
Gout

H
Headache
Herpes
HIV infection
Hypertension

I
Infertility ART
Insomnia
Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)
IVF and Acupuncture

K
Kidney stones

M
Male infertility
Menopausal symptoms
Migraines
Multiple sclerosis

N
Nausea and vomiting
Neck Pain
Neuropathic pain

O
Obesity
Obstetrics
Osteoarthritis

P
Palliative care
Parkinson's disease
PCOS
Post-operative pain
Post traumatic stress disorder
Premenstrual syndrome
Puerperium

R
Raynaud's
Rheumatoid arthritis

S
Sciatica
Sinusitis
Sports Injuries
Stress
Stroke
Substance misuse

T
Tennis elbow
Thyroid disease
Tinnitus
Type-2 Diabetes

U
Urinary incontinence

V
Vertigo

How Does Acupuncture Work?

The way acupuncture explains and understands the human body, health and illness is completely different from that of medical science. Acupuncture is part of Chinese medicine, a metaphorical science that helps us understand how we are part of nature. At its heart lies the concept of qi (pronounced chee) which roughly translated means life force. Qi is the sub-strata of the entire universe and includes everything material and immaterial. In terms of human beings qi runs through various channels throughout the body and can be stimulated at specific points to benefit health.

Standard research methods such as those used to evaluate pharmaceutical drugs are not very useful when applied to acupuncture, and medical science is yet to establish the mechanisms of how it works. However there is a growing body of qualitative research evidence about the effectiveness of acupuncture, a selection of which is listed above. If you want the latest medical scientific thinking I suggest reading The Spark in the Machine - How the Science of Acupuncture Explains the Mysteries of Western Medicine. It is by Dr Daniel Keown who is both a medical doctor and acupuncture practitioner. For the traditional Chinese medicine perspective I recommend Gail Reichstein’s book Wood Becomes Water - Chinese Medicine in Everyday Life.